retour imprimer

Prioritising clean water and sanitation



Sanitation is the single greatest human achievement with regard to health, yet in much of the world it is underappreciated or inaccessible. Talha Burki investigates.
article de presse Feb 2015 ; 2 pages ; The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 15, No. 2, p153–154, February 2015
Aut. Talha Khan Burki
Ed.
The Lancet - London
Téléchargeable sous format: PdF (260 ko)
Téléchargeable chez l'éditeur
Abstract:
Sanitation is the single greatest human achievement with regard to health, yet in much of the world it is underappreciated or inaccessible. Talha Burki investigates.
“Currently, the popular approaches to sanitation place a lot of responsibility on individuals and households and not as much on governments”, adds WaterAid’s Yael Velleman. In the UK, it was legislation that led to universal access to improved sanitation. “Ultimately, it was political will and public finance that pushed that drive—I wonder whether we now expect low-income countries to do something we have never done ourselves”, said Velleman. Pollock advocates a return to a health-for-all approach, attending to the building blocks of public health, such as sanitation and nutrition, and directing major investment into infrastructure and monitoring systems. “I can’t understand why we’re prioritising clinical trials in Africa, and not prioritising clean water”, she told The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Mots clefs:

accès à l'assainissement (DT) (OP) , accès à l'eau (DT) (OP) , alimentation en eau saine (DT) (OP) , politique (DT) (OP)

Editeur/Diffuseur:

The Lancet - London - Royaume Uni
    

En cas de lien brisé, nous le mentionner à communication@pseau.org

   © pS-Eau 2021